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About Me

photo credit Rachel Lacy

Welcome to my little blog!  Thanks for visiting.  My name is Kristina and I like to write.  I like to talk too, but I'm kind of an introvert so I'm better at listening than storytelling. So here's my place to tell stories and share things I've learned; as the oldest sister in my family, I sometimes wished for an older sister who would have guided me. 

I've lived in California, Nevada, Utah, Idaho, Colorado and Texas. During college I also lived near Guangzhou, China and in Asuncion, Paraguay. My husband and I lived in Utah County for sixteen years and had our four children there.  In 2018 we moved to Texas and my youngest is already learning southern manners like, "Yes ma'am."  I'm sure she'll claim Texas as her home state.

I started this blog in 2017 because I have two younger sisters and dozens of friends who may travel the same roads I've already walked, and I wanted a way to share some of my journey with them. (see Happy Birthday Little Blog.)  For example, my last baby is slightly older than my sister's first baby.  Where my mommy journey is filled with "lasts," (as in, this is the last kid I have to potty train!) my sister's journey is filled with "firsts" (first baby teeth, first steps, etc...).  When both of these kiddos were two, I wrote this post:  So you have a two year old?  This blog is my attempt to pass along what I'm learning on my journey through motherhood and marriage.

I majored in psychology and while I'm not a real therapist, my life has definitely been better for what I learned in college.  I've learned some pretty serious life lessons in the years since graduation, one of the most important being to be okay with progress instead of perfection.  For more on that see here:  Work in Progress or church music where I talk about facing my own demons.

It hasn't been too long since I left my thirties behind!  For more about that milestone, check this post:  Turning Forty.  I've concluded that every grey hair on my head is a reflection of wisdom.

Last but certainly not least, my faith and my religion is a huge part of my life.  As you read some of the experiences I'm sharing, you might realize that I'm a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I love my church and am so glad to be part of it.

So why write a blog? When Virginia H. Pearce submitted her mother's stories in a book called, Glimpses into the Life and Heart of Marjorie Pay Hinckley, she explained it really well in the introduction: "This book is not a recipe for others to follow, but just one more example of the gospel in action in the life of a fellow sojourner... And to the final question, "Why publish it?" I respond with what I told Mother, that the gathering and editing of the material had somehow changed me for the better." Her words sum up my thoughts. I hope to share notes with my sisters, neighbors and friends. Often writing and thinking on deep issues is transformative for me personally, and if this provides one more example of faith that resonates with you, then I'm glad. Thanks for visiting! 


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